Many people think that if you opt-out, your DNA and data is never shared or sold, but according to 23andMe and Ancestry’s own documentation, that’s not true. Ancestry.com and 23andMe — the largest companies that, combined, have DNA data of 15 million users — both share anonymized genetic data with outside researchers and companies. When governments have access to DNA databases, ... It’s dwarfed by the data troves of companies such as 23andMe, which has 10 million users and Ancestry.com, with 15 million. Last summer, 23andMe struck a drug-development deal with GlaxoSmithKline, and … Police caught the Golden State Killer using DNA from an ancestry website. Ancestry declined to give law enforcement access to its DNA database, the company said Tuesday. For help accepting a DNA invitation, see Accepting an AncestryDNA® Invitation.For help sharing a family tree, see Sharing a Family Tree.. I did it also with Ancestry.com, i chose not to share my data with 3rd parties when i first signed the contract and unfortunately i have requested to cancel my account and destroy my sample, to be honest i did it as i thought that this DNA test of mine, can become a big threat to my financial world, to be honest i very much doubt about this! Opt-out is not truly opt-out. Here's what you should know about DNA privacy rules. Sharing ethnicity results and matches It’s only opting out of them sharing your non-anonymized data – meaning just the higher level of participation only. DNA results can't be moved from one account to another, but they can appear on multiple accounts at once if the owner (the person whose DNA was tested) or manager invites other people to see them. Legal obligations: Ancestry DNA may share personal information if the company believes it is reasonably necessary to comply with valid legal process …