Charles had been lured to Italy by Ludovico Sforza (Ludovico il Moro), ex-regent of Milan, as a way to eject Ludovico's nephew Gian Galeazzo Sforza and replace him as duke. After settling matters in Milan, Charles moved towards Naples. The family palazzo was subsequently looted, and the substance as well as the form of the Republic of Florence was re-established, with the Medici formally exiled. Piero waited five days before responding that Florence would remain neutral. This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. After a brief period of relative calm, the fragile peaceful equilibrium between the Italian states, laboriously constructed by Piero's father, collapsed in 1494 with the decision of King Charles VIII of France to cross the Alps with an army in order to assert hereditary claims to the Kingdom of Naples. He was buried in the abbey of Monte Cassino. Piero de' Medici (15 February 1472 – 28 December 1503), called Piero the Unfortunate, was the Gran maestro of Florence from 1492 until his exile in 1494. Piero waited five days before responding that Florence would remain neutral. Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.