Those that rebel against God's word, show themselves to be more violent than … He pleads the wretchedness of his case, if God withdrew from him. We pass from depth of despondency to the height of religious confidence and joy. It is thus, ver. He assures himself of an answer of peace. Psalms 13 Commentary, One of over 110 Bible commentaries freely available, this one volume concise commentary provides a condensed look at nearly every verse in the Bible It is thus, Psalm 13:5. The bread of sorrows is sometimes the saint's daily bread; our Master himself was a man of sorrows. Psalms 13 Commentary, One of over 110 Bible commentaries freely available, this commentary by Albert Barnes, a dedicated student of the Bible, continues to be very popular even today. He earnestly prays for comfort. If we bring our cares and griefs to the throne of grace, and leave them there, we may go away like Hannah, and our countenances will be no more said, 1 Samuel 1:18. View Psalm . Finding the new version too difficult to understand? But anxious cares are heavy burdens with which believers often load themselves more than they need. Bibliography InformationHenry, Matthew. If we bring our cares and griefs to the throne of grace, and leave them there, we may go away like Hannah, and our countenances will be no more said, 1 Samuel 1:18. Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Whole Bible provides indepth look at every verse. The psalmist complains that God had long withdrawn. Nothing is more killing to a soul than the want of God's favour; nothing more reviving than the return of it. He earnestly prays for comfort. © 2020 Christianity.com. The sudden, delightful changes in the book of Psalms, are often very remarkable. [1] The title we have selected is taken from Leupold. Study Psalm 131 using Matthew Henry’s Bible Commentary (concise) to better understand Scripture with full outline and verse meaning. 5 But I have trusted in thy mercy; my heart shall rejoice in thy salvation. We should never allow ourselves to make any complaints but what drive us to our knees. The powers of nature, be they ever so strong, so stormy, do what God appoints them, and no more. ). We pass from depth of despondency to the height of religious confidence and joy. He assures himself of an answer of peace. Those who have long been without joy, begin to be without hope. For the thunder as God’s voice see Psalm 29:3, and Note. God sometimes hides his face, and leaves his own children in the dark concerning their interest in him: and this they lay to heart more than any outward trouble whatever. All is gloomy dejection in ver. See the power of faith, and how good it is to draw near to God. He assures himself of an answer of peace. "Concise Commentary on Psalms 13:4". His faith in God's mercy filled his heart with joy in his salvation; for joy and peace come by believing. Psalm 13 – Enlighten My Eyes. for ever? Psalm 13 Commentary: Confidence (5) But in contrast we have David’s statement of confidence in verse 5. Go to, To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient, Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible, Commentary Critical and Explanatory - Unabridged, Kretzmann's Popular Commentary of the Bible, Lange's Commentary on the Holy Scriptures. All Rights Reserved. So, let’s re-read verses 1 and 2. (1-10) The promises of God. By faith he was as confident of salvation, as if it had been completed already. The psalmist complains that God had long withdrawn. All is gloomy dejection in Psalm 13:4; but here the mind of the despondent worshipper rises above all its distressing fears, and throws itself, without reserve, on the mercy and care of its Divine Redeemer. 1706. 4; but here the mind of the despondent worshipper rises above all its distressing fears, and throws itself, without reserve, on the mercy and care of its Divine Redeemer. His faith in God's mercy filled his heart with joy in his salvation; for joy and peace come by believing. Complete Concise Chapter Contents. (Psalm 13:1), he begins his prayer as if he thought God would never give him a kind look more: "How long wilt thou forget me, O Lord? He earnestly prays for comfort. It is a common temptation, when trouble lasts long, to think that it will last always. The psalmist complains that God had long withdrawn. Finding I have that to trust to, I am comforted, though I have no merit of my own. Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (13) In the heavens. The psalmist complains that God had long withdrawn. It is a common temptation, when trouble lasts long, to think that it will last always. The bread of sorrows is sometimes the saint's daily bread; our Master himself was a man of sorrows. In this way believers pour out their prayers, renouncing all hopes but in the mercy of God through the Saviour's blood: and sometimes suddenly, at others gradually, they will find their burdens removed, and their comforts restored; they then allow that their fears and complaints were unnecessary, and acknowledge that the Lord hath dealt bountifully with them. God sometimes hides his face, and leaves his own children in the dark concerning their interest in him: and this they lay to heart more than any outward trouble whatever. YEARNING FOR HELP FROM GOD (FOR THE CHIEF MUSICIAN; A PSALM OF DAVID).. Matthew Henry’s Bible Commentary (concise), Matthew Henry Bible Commentary (complete), California - Do Not Sell My Personal Information. (11-18) Commentary on Psalm 132:1-10 (Read Psalm 132:1-10) David bound himself to find a place for the Lord, for the ark, the token of God's presence. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mhn/psalms-13.html. - God sometimes hides his face, and leaves his own children in the dark concerning their interest in him: and this they lay to heart more than any outward trouble whatever. Study Psalm 13 using Matthew Henry’s Bible Commentary (concise) to better understand Scripture with full outline and verse meaning. Psalm 13 Commentary: Invocation & Lament Now, Psalm 13 starts with two verses that basically display for us David invoking the Lord and giving his lament. In contrast to those who plan to rejoice when David is moved, David himself trusts in God’s mercy. The title tells us both the author and the audience of the psalm: To the Chief Musician. PSALM 13. In this way believers pour out their prayers, renouncing all hopes but in the mercy of God through the Saviour's blood: and sometimes suddenly, at others gradually, they will find their burdens removed, and their comforts restored; they then allow that their fears and complaints were unnecessary, and acknowledge that the Lord hath dealt bountifully with them.