Obviously, with so much conjecture and rumor-mongering being passed off as "fact," it's been a frustrating (but intriguing) research project for me. This would have more of effect on sound than variences in tolerance (comparing domestic to domestic, import to import). I had a nice old one I decided to clean and ruined it.Not sure the newer mics are as nice? The 545s have more smooth high end, softer lows, and more pronounced mids. The main difference one can hear is the character of high end. It's a transformerless 545 great on snare. With older models, some are unbalanced, some are not the best signal to noise. It makes the SM57 sound like a flat response mic (although the SM57 is a great mic for its uses, just a different critter). A 57 is a selected 545 that's painted black. 8,372 2,276. That mic element is the Unidyne III – the engine of the SM58, SM57, 545, and 565. Several different models of the Unidyne III / 545 have come out, mainly to accommodate all of the myriad bizarre mic cable and mic mounting standards that predated modern XLR, some offering switched operation, some not, etc. All are useful. However the difference is smaller than say, compared to Sennheiser 421. My Shure 545 and Sm57 unidyne lll sound exactly the same to me, pretty decent. 545l is a different beast. Well I have the following Shure mics out of the Unidyne lineage. Show 100 post(s) from this thread on one page, https://www.gearslutz.com/board/so-m...od-useful.html, https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=b_dbHUS68ks. The fact that it's great to mic a lead guitar amp, a snare drum or even various horns and harmonica, is just added extra benefit. My modern sm57 sounds very different than the other two, mediocre. The SM57 is an amazing piece of audio engineering and a bargain. Nobody has mentioned the part of the mic that holds the cartridge. I've had more musical experience through the years now and have had the privilege to work with and own some of the best studio mics manufactured, but, when it comes to live sound vocals, lead or harmony, the 545 is one of my overall top choices for most voices I've had the opportunity to work with. Anyway a friend and I were chatting about it and wondering if it was better than a 906 for live. I also have 2 SM57's that are now 20+ years old and one that is only a couple years old. I wanted to come back and chime in. But in the spirit of that thought. Finally tried on my celestial blue cab with my bad cat black cat. The main difference must be the "wide tolerance" that chessparov mentioned. The 545 and SM57 do not use the same cartridge. That's cool, not really what I was talking about at all, cool none the less. 4,065 844 1. This thing sounds freaking amazing on electric guitar cab. $6.95. The Unidyne III has been used in every variation of the 545. to the best of my knowledge Shure still makes four Unidyne III mics: 545SD-LC, 565SD-LC, SM57 and SM58. I've had a chance to do an A/B test with an Unidyne 545 and a new SM57 on a snare. Another Shure worth mentioning is the 548. Super interesting, see what you think. One is from 1969 and the other from 1971. Wanting to expand my dynamics arsenal I picked up a couple 545Ss from the bay & am really pleased with them! Shipped connected for low-impedance operation, the 545SD features a silent magnetic reed on/off switch with lock-on option. That was crazy. 4,065 844 1. Free shipping . Hey there! bob olhsson. Then take a new one apart and look. Online user guide for Shure 545SD wired microphone. Whatever the case, it isn't the same. As with the 545, there were several variations, and some could be switched to Lo-Z operation, while others were apparently only for Hi-Z. You definitely know this mic. 48mm-54mm Microphone Shock Mount w/ Clip For Studio Sound Record Condenser Mic. Recording geeks have come up with all sorts of interesting sounding theories about the difference between the Unidyne III and the SM57, mostly attributing the sonic difference to Shure switching manufacturing from the USA to Mexico in 1985 (or 1975, depending on who your source is!) But, put a question mark on that cause it's been a really long time...? I bought them for live vocals but the feedback was quite an issue. i had ca nice 545sd that i trashed...grrr. Super interesting, see what you think. They are also significantly lower output than the SM57. Shipped connected for low-impedance operation, the 545SD features a silent magnetic reed on/off switch with lock-on option. When you buy products through links across our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. The proof will be how the Mexican ones sound 20 years from now. It makes the SM57 sound like a flat response mic (although the SM57 is a great mic for its uses, just a different critter). Not true. Whatever the case, it isn't the same. The difference in the 20yr old 57's and the new one is also very evident. You definitely know this mic. To give this my own test, I just scored a couple of vintage Unidyne III 545 mics for $40 out the door on eBay today, and I am eagerly awaiting them in the mail. Unidyne's high end focus is little bit higher (and there's more of it) and the high end/upper mid is less resonance-y altogether. I'm not certain, but I *think* the PE54 was just a 545 that came pre-wired for Hi-Z operation. Shure A25D Microphone Clip Fits SM58, SM57 & other 3/4" in. I've had a chance to do an A/B test with an Unidyne 545 and a new SM57 on a snare. Seen Paul Butterfield use this mic on many gigs. The predecessor of the 56 and 57 was the 546, not the 545. gtoledo3. BTW an excellent complement to the SM57 is the Electro-Voice EV 635a, another desert island mic. I have always thought the SM57 sounded better than the 545, more top and a little tighter bottom on the SM57, but it is a matter of taste as to which you prefer. It's not handy right now but I looked it up a while ago and the mic and PA were made some time in the eighties in the USA. - - Shure Unidyne III 545 vs. SM57 ? The PE54 and 545 are almost exactly the same mic, not the same as the SM57 at all. My 57 sounds hifi compared to this 545 to put it simply. If I'm not mistaken, I believe I saw that the 548 was predecessor to the early 57's. ... Jeeez, I mean, If you got like the USA SM 57, unidyne III, old unidyne, tab funkenwerk and without transformer, you can almost track a whole drum session just with sm 57s :D That'd actually be quite interesting. In my opinion, it's a great vocal mic, much better than it's first cousin the SM58 (which isn't the same at all sonically) for most singers. They all sang and had great lead vocal and harmony sound. The 545SD Classic Unidyne® Instrument Microphone is a dual-impedance, unidirectional, dynamic microphone. The only thing missing is over heads for which I use the shure 535. One of the great Top 40 Bands I remember that used to play around the Tampa Bay Area in Florida, The Split Ends, used the PE 545 exclusively as their 4 vocal mics. US Authorized Dealer. Ruby Baby. I would think that many years of being put in front of loud amps, drums, and people screaming must have some effect on the mic capsule and result in subtle loss of high end detail which can make the older ones sound smoother. Hey there! Unidyne's high end focus is little bit higher (and there's more of it) and the high end/upper mid is less resonance-y altogether. I chose the S version (the model with the threaded stand adapter) cause I wanted US assemblies, understanding that they're no longer in production (only the "SD" version is) and that they were never made in Mexico, only in the States. Any good? bob olhsson. I have various SM57's from different eras (USA and Mexico) and my theory is much of the sonic difference in the high end (the older ones sounding "smoother" in the high end compared to the newer Made In Mexico ones) has to with the age of the mic and how much it has been used. The main difference one can hear is the character of high end.