The range of maturity in this group extends to include carcasses from the oldest animals marketed. Be sure to communicate current fees up-front with both the meat processor and the purchaser of the beef animal. Carcasses can receive both the Yield Grade and Quality Grade or only one of these grades. Results from the Mississippi Farm to Feedlot program show that ribeye area averaged 12.95 sq. Standard. Quality grades are widely used as a “language” within the beef industry, making business transactions easier and providing a vital link to support rural America. Lung condemnation incidence was 11.5 per cent. A highly-trained USDA employee known as a USDA grader or approved electronic instrumentation assign beef Yield Grades and Quality Grades to beef carcasses postharvest following a period of chilling typically ranging from 18 to 48 hours. A 700-pound carcass of this yield grade, which is near the borderline of Yield Grades 4 and 5, might have nine-tenths inch of fat over the ribeye, 9.8 square inches of ribeye, and 3.5 percent of its carcass weight in kidney, pelvic, and heart fat. Beef cattle breed associations are beginning to address tenderness as a trait of interest in national cattle evaluations. Still, more experienced customers may feel they have not received the entire product that they purchased when the amount of product received varies from purchase-to-purchase. The 2005 National Beef Quality Audit reported a calloused ribeye incidence of 0.3 per cent. Generally, the per centage of retail product decreases as cattle increase in weight because of increased fat deposition, but this depends on the growth stage of the animal. a. To have beef carcasses graded, a packing plant must request that carcasses be graded and must also pay for this service. The National Beef Quality Audit outlined a range of 650 to 850 pounds as an industry target for carcass weight. The per centage of these cattle grading Choice – or better was 43 per cent and also displayed an increasing trend. There are usually small deposits of fat in the flanks and cod or udder. Producers who provide carcass information to potential buyers position themselves to be rewarded for producing a quality product. Table 3 below provides the break down of the cuts of beef and their corresponding percentages. So how the beef is fabricated by the meat processor, boneless or bone-in, can provide another and potentially confusing source of variation in how much beef the consumer is receiving. Carcasses within the full range of maturity classified as beef are included in the Utility grade. Trim loss from bruising can impact carcass value, particularly when high-value sections of the carcass are involved. Both excessively small and excessively large ribeyes are quality challenges for the beef industry. Grading beef carcasses is optional. The minimum degree of marbling required increases with advancing maturity throughout this group from a minimum slight amount to a maximum slight amount (see Figure 1 pdf) and the ribeye muscle is slightly firm. A “No Roll” category refers to all carcasses that do not meet the requirements for the USDA Select Grade and would likely grade USDA Standard if graded. They range from 1 (lean and heavy muscled) to 5 (fat and light muscled). beef carcasses: a Yield Grade for estimating A carcass in Yield Grade 1 usually has only a thin layer of external fat over the ribs, loins, rumps, and clods, and slight deposits of fat in the flanks and cod or udder. Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point Systems (HACCP). Acceptable tenderness levels depend in part on where and how the product will be marketed. Many preharvest management factors impact tenderness as well include animal nutrition, stress, and health. The range in maturity in this group extends to include carcasses from the oldest animals produced. For example, if a calculated yield grade is 2.8, the final yield grade is 2. c. Carcasses in the older group, range from those described above as representative of the juncture of the two groups to those at the maximum maturity permitted in the Prime grade, which have chine bones tinged with red and cartilages on the ends of the thoracic vertebrae that are partially ossified. The 2005 National Beef Quality Audit indicated that 62 and 42 per cent of branded beef programs had specifications for marbling and Yield Grade, respectively. “Calloused” ribeyes are the result of steatosis of longissimus muscle. Regardless of how cattle are marketed, whether on a dressed-weight basis or on a value-based grid, carcass value is always tied to the weight of the carcass. a. Trimming that damages the major muscle groups of the wholesale round, loin, rib, or chuck is a “major” defect. It is subjectively evaluated because chronological age (age in months) of a beef animal is not always known at harvest. It is an important factor in determination of Yield Grade. As cattle age, these tips ossify or change from soft, pearly-white cartilage to hard, porous bone. d. Beef produced from cows is not eligible for the Prime grade. They are an important consideration for beef cattle producers in cattle selection and management, especially when cattle ownership is retained through harvest and cattle are marketed on value-based carcass grids. Internal or KPH fat is expressed as a per centage of hot carcass weight and is used in Yield Grade determination. The latter task is probably one the hardest issues related to direct marketing of beef cattle. a. While not all beef carcasses from U.S. fed cattle are designated for grading, most are now officially graded. Canadian Beef Merchandising Guide (PDF) ARGENTINA. “Blood splash” describes localized hemorrhaging (bleeding) within the muscles of a beef carcass. The minimum degree of marbling required increases with advancing maturity throughout this group from minimum practically devoid to maximum practically devoid (see Figure 1 pdf) and the ribeye muscle may be moderately soft. Thus, five maturity groups are recognized. These producers are now marketing their animals directly to consumers for "freezer beef". c. A 1,100-pound carcass of this yield grade, which is near the borderline of Yield Grades 1 and 2, might have four-tenths inch of fat over the ribeye, 19.1 square inches of ribeye, and 2.0 percent of its weight in kidney, pelvic, and heart fat. … For example, a beef carcass with a calculated Yield Grade of 2.98 would be classified as Yield Grade 2, not Yield Grade 3. Whole carcass condemnations were not found. The rib bones are quasi round with a red, youthful appearance in young cattle. Beef Quality Grades (Eight) There are eight beef quality grades. There usually is a moderately thick layer of fat over the loins, ribs, and inside rounds and the fat over the rumps, hips, and clods usually is thick. Packers monetarily discount heavyweight and lightweight carcasses that do not fit their specifications. Management of days on feed, implant regimes, and feeding programs can also be changed to affect carcass weights. Factors other than age can alter lean color and texture, so most of the emphasis on maturity evaluation is placed on observation of bone characteristics and cartilage ossification. The rib bones are slightly wide and slightly flat and the ribeye muscle is light red in color and is fine in texture. A 700-pound carcass of this yield grade, which is near the borderline of Yield Grades 2 and 3, might have five-tenths inch of fat over the ribeye, 12.3 square inches of ribeye, and 2.5 percent of its weight in kidney, pelvic, and heart fat. As cattle age, the ribs flatten out and develop a white appearance. c. Carcasses in the older group range from those described above as representative of the juncture of the two groups, to those at the maximum maturity permitted in the Choice grade, which have chine bones tinged with red and cartilages on the ends of the thoracic vertebrae are partially ossified.