Velour also remains a reasonably popular material for upholstery. While India produces more raw cotton than any other nation, China exports the most finished cotton products. At this point, fashion designers began capitalizing on the trend away from conservative apparel and started making jackets, pants, shirts, and all manner of other apparel types using this velvet-like fabric. With the rise of synthetic velour, cotton velour is now used primarily to make apparel or upholstery, and it is no longer a popular material for stage curtains. The use of velour in apparel was remarkably limited until the mid-1960s. The first step in the production of velour fabric is the acquisition of an appropriate textile material. Velour Leather The velour leather, on the other hand, is a unique leather of its kind because it is worked by sanding the grain side of the animal’s skin (buckskins, chamois or reindeer), obtaining a greater writing effect and a surface even more delicate and silky to the touch. Today, however, the majority of velour fabric consists of polyester fibers. Based on etymology alone, it’s clear that this fabric originated in France, but it is less clear which manufacturer first developed velour as an alternative to velvet. Highly similar to velour, duvetyne is a velvet-like fabric with a twill weave. The majority of worldwide cotton production heavily involves the use of toxic agrochemicals, and cotton monocropping inevitably leads to soil erosion. Therefore, velveteen was originally less expensive than velvet, and this price difference still exists when these fabrics are not made using synthetic fibers. The development of velour was a direct response to the time-consuming attributes of this process, which drove the price of velvet incredibly high. Velour fabric can be made from cotton or synthetic material, and has a range of qualities depending on the weight and type chosen. Using a variety of toxic chemicals, textile manufacturers render this polymer into a liquid and extrude it through spinnerets to form fibers. The signature soft texture on the surface of velour is known as ‘pile’, and is made by cutting across looped threads with a special weaving process. Initially ridiculed as being too similar to upholstery, velour clothing became normalized throughout the 1970s before losing popularity in the 1980s. Velour creates hand-made, high-quality, silk and mink lashes that you can wear 25+ times. Velour or velours is a plush, knitted fabric or textile similar to velvet or velveteen. Regardless of its nation of origin, cotton velour may also be eligible for OEKO-TEX or Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) certification. While velour was traditionally made using cotton, velvet was traditionally made using silk, making velvet the softer fabric by far. GOTS also certifies synthetic velour if it is made using recycled materials, and the Global Recycle Standard (GRS) offers similar services. Boris Hodakel is the founder and CEO of Sewport - an online marketplace connecting brands and manufacturers, former founder of various clothing manufacturing services. Certain types of velour harm the environment more than others, however, and since this fabric remains the default material for stage curtains around the world, it’s worth examining the environmental impact of velour in detail. Most velour on the market consists of either cotton or polyester fibers. Until the mid-19th century, all velour fabric was made using cotton. There are a variety of different types of velour, and there are also a few different fabrics that are easy to mistake with this unique textile. However, most velour-upholstered pieces of furniture are vintage or antique since velour is not particularly in vogue at the moment. Polyester may be spun into yarn, but it is also commonly produced in the form of thick fibers that resemble yarn. The most comfortable and easy to apply lashes you'll find. Weight per linear yard is fairly self-explanatory, as is fiber content, but what about “picks” […] Cotton velour is more desirable from an environmental perspective for a variety of reasons, but the global cotton production industry isn’t without its own negative environmental effects. Difference Between Velvet and Velour Velour is not to be confused with velvet. Fabric manufacturers also use toxic chemicals in the process of manufacturing synthetic fibers, and these chemicals can harm textile workers and the environment. Connect with Boris on LinkedIn. Velour leather can also be used to make jackets and upholstery. These certificates usually contain notices of approval from fire marshals or other relevant authorities. Records of velour fabric date to the 1840s, and this fabric remained a staple fabric for upholstery throughout the following century. Increased reliance on synthetic materials for velour production has significantly worsened this fabric’s environmental impact. On the back of many of the sample cards, we include construction specifications provided to us by the mill, most of which is probably “greek” to the customer. As a cheaper alternative to silk velvet, cotton velour nonetheless offered many of the same properties as the textile it was designed to imitate. Characterized by their tight-fitting upper portions and flared legs, these brightly-colored tracksuits were momentarily popular before becoming decidedly passé. While this fabric was universally prized among members of every economic stratum, the complex production processes needed to manufacture velvet resulted in prohibitively high prices. Polyester is a polymer constructed of components of coal and petroleum. During the late 1990s and early 2000s, velour once again enjoyed a surge of popularity as prominent fashion designers started dressing celebrities in velour tracksuits. Here are a few examples: While usually a reference to the woven cotton or synthetic fabric, “velour” can also refer to velour leather, a type of animal hide textile that’s similar in texture to suede or chamois. Since it remained coarser than velvet despite the best efforts of textile manufacturers, velour never attained significant popularity as a material for upscale garments. China is also the largest producer and exporter of synthetic fabric products. Originating from the French word for velvet, velour is highly similar to velvet and velveteen. He is passionate about e-commerce, marketing and production digitisation. Since velour stage curtains are rarely washed, microfiber pollution is more of a concern in the context of synthetic velour clothing. Cotton velour is usually considerably more expensive than polyester velour. While weaving velour is similar to weaving velvet, it is simpler and therefore more cost-effective. As the fabric that velour was designed to imitate, velvet shares many of the properties of its less-expensive textile cousin. Chrome tanned leather is ground from the inside, which forms a delicate, soft layer on the surface. What is Baize Fabric: Properties, How its Made and Where, What is Angora Wool Fabric: Properties, How its Made and Where, What is Coolmax Fabric: Properties, How its Made and Where. Velour is used in a wide variety of applications, including clothing and upholstery. Velour is more durable than velvet while retaining many of the desirable properties of this luxurious fabric, which has led to its extensive use as a stage curtain material. 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Synthetic fibers like polyester and rayon are not biodegradable, and they release microfibers into the hydrosphere with every washing. Despite its luxurious finish, it is typically made from cotton, and can even be made from synthetics such as polyester. It might also be made from artificial materials, such as polyester, depending on the manufacturer and the intended use.